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 The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize

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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   3/23/2018, 6:35 pm

Trump Worshiping Cross Dresser wrote:
Trump Worshiping Cross Dresser wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Troll wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Troll wrote:
Artie Wins Again wrote:
 
All that's missing is a photo of him wearing a MAGA hat.

Speaking of clothing: what color did you dress Jazz in today?
The same color panties you and your kids are wearing.

You have finally admitted you wear panties. Congratulations on finally coming out. cyclops

And you have finally admitted that you play with, and accessorize, a Jazz Jennings doll.
Congratulations on finally coming to terms with your preferences.
Making shit up now? I know you're embarrassed but making false accusations against me isn't going to help your credibility,dearie.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   3/23/2018, 6:47 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Cross Dresser wrote:
Trump Worshiping Cross Dresser wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Troll wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Troll wrote:
Artie Wins Again wrote:
 
All that's missing is a photo of him wearing a MAGA hat.

Speaking of clothing: what color did you dress Jazz in today?

The same color panties you and your kids are wearing.

You have finally admitted you wear panties. Congratulations on finally coming out. cyclops

And you have finally admitted that you play with, and accessorize, a Jazz Jennings doll.
Congratulations on finally coming to terms with your preferences.
Making shit up now? I know you're embarrassed but making false accusations against me isn't going to help your credibility,dearie.

I'm not making anything up.
In your own post you claim that you dressed your Jazz doll, although you claim that you dressed it in panties of an unspecified color.
Pay attention, Artchel.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/6/2018, 5:30 pm

Another "Law abiding responsible gun owner"?

Highway sniper who shot 2 idolized Nikolas Cruz, sheriff says
Quote :
(CNN)A sniper who targeted cars on a Georgia highway left behind a "hate-filled" document describing the Parkland high school gunman Nikolas Cruz as a hero, a sheriff said.
Authorities identified the sniper as Rex Whitmire Harbour, 26, of Snellville, Georgia.
He shot at cars in Gainesville on Friday, leaving three people injured before he shot himself dead, Hall County Sheriff Gerald Couch said in a statement Saturday.
Moved by school tragedy, community comes together to give Parkland seniors a prom to remember
Moved by school tragedy, community comes together to give Parkland seniors a prom to remember
Harbour hid in the woods as he waited for motorists on the side of Georgia 365, Couch said. He fired at least 17 times and hit seven cars, wounding two men in the hip and leg. A third person -- a woman -- was slightly injured by broken glass, authorities said.

The two men suffered injuries that are not life-threatening, and are in stable condition.
Search of home and car
A search of Harbour's home revealed a "hate-filled" document applauding Cruz, who massacred 17 people at a high School in Florida in February.
"He called Nikolas Cruz a 'hero' and said Cruz gave him 'courage and confidence,' " Couch said.
When police searched Harbour's car, they found three 9mm handguns, a .22 caliber rifle, one 12-gauge shotgun and a BB gun, Couch said.
"Also in the vehicle, investigators found approximately 3,000 rounds of .22 ammunition, 350 rounds of 9mm ammunition and 150 12-gauge shotgun shells," he said.
The shootings
The first 911 call came just before midday Friday from a motorist who said her husband had been shot, Couch said.
"Almost immediately, additional callers reported hearing gunshots and advised that other vehicles had been struck by bullets in the same vicinity," he added. "911 callers also indicated a second adult male motorist had been hit by a bullet."
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/6/2018, 9:00 pm

Artchel 60438 wrote:
Another "Law abiding responsible gun owner"?

Actually, not another law-abiding responsible gun owner.
Actually, a psychotic would-be murderer.
And, for the record: not a damn thing to do with religion, either, so I'm not quite sure why you feel that this incident belongs in this thread.
But, I long ago decided to not expect any semblance of rationality from you, and, once again, I was not disappointed.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/6/2018, 11:12 pm

Trump Worshiping Gun Nut wrote:
Artie Gets It Right Again wrote:
Another "Law abiding responsible gun owner"?

Actually, not another law-abiding responsible gun owner.
Nope,sorry sluggo but he was indeed.

Quote :
The sheriff said that Harbour’s background did not contain red flags. Authorities couldn’t find any violence or “specific links to any type of activity such as witnessed Friday.” They couldn’t find “any history or signs of engaging in violent action.” The suspect’s Facebook page “revealed no affiliation or activity with any violent group(s).” There were no concerns raised in FBI checks.

Trump Worshiping Gun Nut wrote:
https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/rex-harbour-whitmire-facebook-photo-georgia/
Actually, a psychotic would-be murderer.
But  up until he pulled the trigger he was a another law-abiding responsible gun owner. No red flags,no nothing.
Obsessive Compulsive Trump Worshiping Gun Nut Who always Needs To Have the Laat Word wrote:
And, for the record: not a damn thing to do with religion, either, so I'm not quite sure why you feel that this incident belongs in this thread.
It has everything to do with religion,Shorty. The law abiding gun owner was not a Muslim but just another right-wing wack-a-doodle that probably attended church.
My sincerest apologies on the shortage of Muslims commuting mass murder. It's obviously eating at you that it's always more likely that a white person is the shooter. Toodles
sunny
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/7/2018, 9:36 am

Artchel 60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 604 wrote:
Another "Law abiding responsible gun owner"?

Actually, not another law-abiding responsible gun owner.
Nope,sorry sluggo but he was indeed.

No, law-abiding responsible gun owners do not do the things he did.



Artchel 60438 wrote:
 It has everything to do with religion,Shorty. The law abiding gun owner was not a Muslim but just another right-wing wack-a-doodle that probably attended church.

You are calling this an act of religious extremism based upon your unsubstantiated assumption that he "probably attended church".
That is quite possibly in the Top Ten list of the stupidest things you have ever said - no mean feat, considering that nearly everything you post literally drips with stupid.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/7/2018, 2:51 pm

Trump Worshiping Gun Nut wrote:
Artie Always Wins wrote:
Trump Worshiping Muslim Hater wrote:
Artie Makes Trolls Look Stupid wrote:
Another "Law abiding responsible gun owner"?
Actually, not another law-abiding responsible gun owner.
Nope,sorry sluggo but he was indeed.

No, law-abiding responsible gun owners do not do the things he did.
We've already gone over this...Pay attention!    
Quote :
The sheriff said that Harbour’s background did not contain red flags. Authorities couldn’t find any violence or “specific links to any type of activity such as witnessed Friday.” They couldn’t find “any history or signs of engaging in violent action.” The suspect’s Facebook page “revealed no affiliation or activity with any violent group(s).” There were no concerns raised in FBI checks.
   https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/rex-harbour-whitmire-facebook-photo-georgia/
That,my idiot troll is the definition of a law abiding gun owner.....right up until he snapped.Sleep


Artie Makes The Troll Look Foolish 60438 wrote:
 It has everything to do with religion,Shorty. The law abiding gun owner was not a Muslim but just another right-wing wack-a-doodle that probably attended church.
Trump Worshiping Gun Nut wrote:
You are calling this an act of religious extremism based upon your unsubstantiated assumption that he "probably attended church".
Can you prove he didn't attend church? Whatever religion he is the bottom line is that he wasn't a Muslim. Once again it proves you are more likely to shot by a right-wing wacko. Sleep
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/7/2018, 3:22 pm

Artchel 60438 wrote:
Quote :
The sheriff said that Harbour’s background did not contain red flags. Authorities couldn’t find any violence or “specific links to any type of activity such as witnessed Friday.” They couldn’t find “any history or signs of engaging in violent action.” The suspect’s Facebook page “revealed no affiliation or activity with any violent group(s).” There were no concerns raised in FBI checks.
   https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/rex-harbour-whitmire-facebook-photo-georgia/
That,my idiot troll is the definition of a law abiding gun owner.....right up until he snapped.Sleep

A law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime - a criminal committed this crime.
What ridiculous point do you believe you have made this time?



Artchel 60438 wrote:
 Can you prove he didn't attend church?

It's not up to me to prove or disprove anything about his religious affiliation, or lack thereof.
You introduced the matter - you own it.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/7/2018, 4:07 pm

Trump Worshiping Wack-A-Doodle wrote:
Artie Always Wins wrote:
Quote :
The sheriff said that Harbour’s background did not contain red flags. Authorities couldn’t find any violence or “specific links to any type of activity such as witnessed Friday.” They couldn’t find “any history or signs of engaging in violent action.” The suspect’s Facebook page “revealed no affiliation or activity with any violent group(s).” There were no concerns raised in FBI checks.
   https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/rex-harbour-whitmire-facebook-photo-georgia/
That,my idiot troll is the definition of a law abiding gun owner.....right up until he snapped.Sleep

A law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime - a criminal committed this crime.
What ridiculous point do you believe you have made this time?
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner. Thus a law abiding gun owner can always snap and turn into a possible mass murderer.

Artie Always Wins wrote:
 Can you prove he didn't attend church?

It's not up to me to prove or disprove anything about his religious affiliation, or lack thereof.
You introduced the matter - you own it.[/quote]
So in other words you can't prove he didn't attend church. Thanks for admitting it
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 7:24 am

Artchel 60438 wrote:
 
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 60438 wrote:
That,my idiot troll is the definition of a law abiding gun owner.....right up until he snapped.Sleep

A law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime - a criminal committed this crime.
What ridiculous point do you believe you have made this time?

Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

When he committed his acts, he was most certainly not a law-abiding gun owner - he was a criminal.
Can you not see the difference?
So, no - a law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime.




Artchel 60438 wrote:
 Can you prove he didn't attend church?

happy jack wrote:
It's not up to me to prove or disprove anything about his religious affiliation, or lack thereof.
You introduced the matter - you own it.
So in other words you can't prove he didn't attend church. Thanks for admitting it[/quote]

How would I know whether or not he attended church and, more to the point, why would I care, inasmuch as I never made any claim whatsoever as to his church attendance? It was, and is, your responsibility to substantiate that claim, and all indications are that you were flat-out making things up (as usual) when you made that claim.
Incidentally, where is Hole Hogg and his gang while all this is going on?
Do they only care when they are affected?
And that movement of his - you know, the one you predicted would be steamrolling the nation - how's that working out for you?
About as well as your other predictions, apparently.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 8:50 am

Trump Worshiping Gun Nut wrote:
Artie Gets It Right wrote:
 
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 60438 wrote:
That,my idiot troll is the definition of a law abiding gun owner.....right up until he snapped.Sleep

A law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime - a criminal committed this crime.
What ridiculous point do you believe you have made this time?[/b]
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

When he committed his acts, he was most certainly not a law-abiding gun owner - he was a criminal.
Can you not see the difference?
So, no - a law-abiding gun owner did not commit this crime.[/b]
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner. The facts are the facts. Sleep
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 10:09 am

Artchel 60438 wrote:
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

And after he opened fire, he became a criminal.
I still don't see what point you believe you have made.
By the way, have you found out which church he worshipped in?
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Artie60438



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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 12:32 pm

Advocate for the murder of school children wrote:
Artie Bags the Troll wrote:
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

And after he opened fire, he became a criminal.
I still don't see what point you believe you have made.

You just made the point for me....1.Prior to the shootings he was a "law abiding gun owner". Thus it's always a possibility that a "law abiding gun owner" can snap and become a mass murderer depending on how much fire power and ammo he has.[/quote]
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 1:24 pm

Artchel 60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 60438 wrote:
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

And after he opened fire, he became a criminal.
I still don't see what point you believe you have made.

You just made the point for me....1.Prior to the shootings he was a "law abiding gun owner". Thus it's always a possibility that a "law abiding gun owner" can snap and become a mass murderer depending on how much fire power and ammo he has.



Actually, you just made the point for me.
Prior to the torture, rape, and murders, he was an assistant Democratic precinct captain, Democratic political candidate, and a clown (pardon the redundancy). Thus, it's always a possibility that a Democratic political candidate can snap and become a mass murderer, depending on how cool his clown suit is, and whether or not he has room in his crawlspace for the bodies of 33 boys and men.
What you clearly cannot grasp is that it is impossible to predict what any given person will do based upon his prior legal behavior.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wayne_Gacy[/b]
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Artie60438



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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 3:21 pm

Advocate for the murder of school children wrote:
Artie Bags the Troll 60438 wrote:
Advocate for the murder of school children wrote:
Artie Bags the Troll 60438 wrote:
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

And after he opened fire, he became a criminal.
I still don't see what point you believe you have made.

You just made the point for me....1.Prior to the shootings he was a "law abiding gun owner". Thus it's always a possibility that a "law abiding gun owner" can snap and become a mass murderer depending on how much fire power and ammo he has.

Actually, you just made the point for me.
Prior to the torture, rape, and murders, he was an assistant Democratic precinct captain, Democratic political candidate, and a clown (pardon the redundancy). Thus, it's always a possibility that a Democratic political candidate can snap and become a mass murderer, depending on how cool his clown suit is, and whether or not he has room in his crawlspace for the bodies of 33 boys and men.
What you clearly cannot grasp is that it is impossible to predict what any given person will do based upon his prior legal behavior.[/b]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wayne_Gacy[/b]
Gacy never used a gun,dumb ass. It took him 6 years to rack up those murders. The "law abiding gun owner" in Vegas killed more than that in one night.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   5/8/2018, 5:26 pm

Artchel 60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artchel 60438 wrote:
Right up to the point he opened fire he was a law abiding gun owner.

And after he opened fire, he became a criminal.
I still don't see what point you believe you have made.

You just made the point for me....1.Prior to the shootings he was a "law abiding gun owner". Thus it's always a possibility that a "law abiding gun owner" can snap and become a mass murderer depending on how much fire power and ammo he has.

Actually, you just made the point for me.
Prior to the torture, rape, and murders, he was an assistant Democratic precinct captain, Democratic political candidate, and a clown (pardon the redundancy). Thus, it's always a possibility that a Democratic political candidate can snap and become a mass murderer, depending on how cool his clown suit is, and whether or not he has room in his crawlspace for the bodies of 33 boys and men.
What you clearly cannot grasp is that it is impossible to predict what any given person will do based upon his prior legal behavior.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wayne_Gacy[/b]
Gacy never used a gun,dumb ass. It took him 6 years to rack up those murders. The "law abiding gun owner" in Vegas killed more than that in one night.

Committing mass murder without a gun?
How could that possibly have happened?
I hope that it has sunk in for you that, when a mass murder occurs, it is not the weapon of choice that is the real issue - it is the 'snapping'.
But I have no doubt that each and every one of Gacy's victims rests more easily in his grave knowing that he was tortured, raped, and murdered as an individual, and over a lengthy period of time, rather than being killed as a member of a group, and as just another face in the crowd.


Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes Rolling Eyes

Fucking moron.
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Artie60438



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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   6/30/2018, 7:04 am

Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter had deep, dark links to the alt-right
Quote :
In Jarrod Ramos’ disturbing Twitter history, numerous far-right links and hints of violence against journalists

Paul Rosenberg
June 30, 2018 10:00am (UTC)
When the identity of the apparent gunman in the massacre of five journalists in Annapolis, Maryland, was revealed, area resident John Hutson, a retired Navy admiral who is now a prominent consultant and writer, had a shock of recognition. The suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had contacted Hutson in March 2015, taunting him about his role in alerting law enforcement and thwarting a potential mass killer who threatened schoolchildren and Jews in far-away Montana.

That first individual in Montana, David Lenio, overflowed with hyperbolic threats, and Hutson’s efforts to stop him succeeded, as I reported at Salon, just after it happened. Ramos was more cryptic less overtly demonstrative—but in the end, far more deadlier. Both were somewhat enigmatic, angry loners, with an unmistakable affinity for the racist alt-right.

“Jarrod Ramos was a lone nut who was not politically motivated, but he was politically influenced by the alt-right,” Hutson told Salon.

Researcher Fred Clarkson agrees. “Ramos and David Lenio seem to have been drawn into the orbit of far-right visions of anti-democratic violence, even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:

“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.  

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:

Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’s tweet seemed over the top as well:

In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge against. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series, called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had  gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people.  This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:

These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

   In the court documents Ramos referred to himself as an agent of the Inquisition, and a crusader who cannot be killed. The Inquisition was a holy inquiry, where church authority superseded that of the civil authority. A crusader is the hand of God, waging a holy war, in the same way that the Charlie Hebdo massacres were. [In the documents] Ramos appeals to "higher authority," and he capitalizes "Higher Authority." This is similar to the way that the violent wing of the anti-abortion movement has appealed to "Higher Law," which they capitalize, to justify homicide against providers of safe, legal abortion, as well as judges and political figures who support the right.

Clarkson sees this tying back to Peroutka’s old allies at the League of the South. “Ramos came to see himself as some kind of vigilante for righteousness, casting himself for example as a 'crusader' and gunning down innocent people in a newsroom," Clarkson said, which "is not unlike the militaristic, millennial vision of Michael Hill, president of the League of the South.” Clarkson said. “Last year [Hill] rallied what he calls the Southern Defense Force, which he envisions as not just a modern Confederate army but the ‘Army of the True Living God.’ This is the group that played a prominent role in the Unite the Right march on Charlottesville.”

Hutson links these violent longings to Ramos' aristocratic pretensions. “His writing style is very arch. He appears to be writing what he conceives of as literature. His speech is highly stylized and idiosyncratic, and uses the metaphors of a holy war. A sense of embitterment and homicidal ideation comes through clearly. He writes about literal carnage, making clear that ... he means this in a literal sense. So it's not for nothing that you think about people like the Army of God.”

Ramos wasn’t acting on anyone’s orders, and despite his apparent linkages to white supremacy never expressed any clear political ideology. But there's little doubt he was influenced and shape by some of the darkest forces in our society.
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy who was a  law abiding responsible gun owner right up to the minute he pulled the trigger.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   6/30/2018, 10:50 am

Artie60438 wrote:
Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter had deep, dark links to the alt-right
Quote :
In Jarrod Ramos’ disturbing Twitter history, numerous far-right links and hints of violence against journalists

Paul Rosenberg
June 30, 2018 10:00am (UTC)
When the identity of the apparent gunman in the massacre of five journalists in Annapolis, Maryland, was revealed, area resident John Hutson, a retired Navy admiral who is now a prominent consultant and writer, had a shock of recognition. The suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had contacted Hutson in March 2015, taunting him about his role in alerting law enforcement and thwarting a potential mass killer who threatened schoolchildren and Jews in far-away Montana.

That first individual in Montana, David Lenio, overflowed with hyperbolic threats, and Hutson’s efforts to stop him succeeded, as I reported at Salon, just after it happened. Ramos was more cryptic less overtly demonstrative—but in the end, far more deadlier. Both were somewhat enigmatic, angry loners, with an unmistakable affinity for the racist alt-right.

“Jarrod Ramos was a lone nut who was not politically motivated, but he was politically influenced by the alt-right,” Hutson told Salon.

Researcher Fred Clarkson agrees. “Ramos and David Lenio seem to have been drawn into the orbit of far-right visions of anti-democratic violence, even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:

“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.  

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:

Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’s tweet seemed over the top as well:

In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge against. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series, called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had  gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people.  This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:

These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

   In the court documents Ramos referred to himself as an agent of the Inquisition, and a crusader who cannot be killed. The Inquisition was a holy inquiry, where church authority superseded that of the civil authority. A crusader is the hand of God, waging a holy war, in the same way that the Charlie Hebdo massacres were. [In the documents] Ramos appeals to "higher authority," and he capitalizes "Higher Authority." This is similar to the way that the violent wing of the anti-abortion movement has appealed to "Higher Law," which they capitalize, to justify homicide against providers of safe, legal abortion, as well as judges and political figures who support the right.

Clarkson sees this tying back to Peroutka’s old allies at the League of the South. “Ramos came to see himself as some kind of vigilante for righteousness, casting himself for example as a 'crusader' and gunning down innocent people in a newsroom," Clarkson said, which "is not unlike the militaristic, millennial vision of Michael Hill, president of the League of the South.” Clarkson said. “Last year [Hill] rallied what he calls the Southern Defense Force, which he envisions as not just a modern Confederate army but the ‘Army of the True Living God.’ This is the group that played a prominent role in the Unite the Right march on Charlottesville.”

Hutson links these violent longings to Ramos' aristocratic pretensions. “His writing style is very arch. He appears to be writing what he conceives of as literature. His speech is highly stylized and idiosyncratic, and uses the metaphors of a holy war. A sense of embitterment and homicidal ideation comes through clearly. He writes about literal carnage, making clear that ... he means this in a literal sense. So it's not for nothing that you think about people like the Army of God.”

Ramos wasn’t acting on anyone’s orders, and despite his apparent linkages to white supremacy never expressed any clear political ideology. But there's little doubt he was influenced and shape by some of the darkest forces in our society.
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy who was a  law abiding responsible gun owner right up to the minute he pulled the trigger.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/06/media-bias-annapolis-shooting/

The Race to Be Wrong First about Annapolis
By Kyle Smith

June 29, 2018 5:14 PM


The shooter’s identity had not even been released when many prominent voices on the left began blaming Trump for the attack.
If you’re at all normal, which is to say not hysterically progressive, your reaction to initial reports of a horrific newsroom shooting in Annapolis, Md., was probably to assume it was the act of a disgruntled ex-employee. That is, after all, the usual back story to workplace massacres. Or your mind might have turned to other common motivators for such acts — psychosis, unrequited male affection. If you’re conversant with local newspapering specifically, you might have considered the special worry that accompanies this job: the danger of one of your readers being enraged by your coverage of a micro-feud involving zoning permits or construction detours or school-board composition or some other niche matter in which passions run inversely proportional to historical importance.


On the #Resist left, though, a faction increasingly prone to put emotions before reason, indeed to mistake the former for the latter, the immediate response was: This is on President Trump. Trump is up to his wrists in blood. Hasn’t Trump been railing at the press this week and for three solid years since he first announced his presidential candidacy? Did he not dub the media the “enemy of the people” on Monday night in South Carolina?


The shooter’s identity had not even been released when many prominent voices on the left began blaming Trump for either directly or indirectly inspiring the attack. American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten tweeted, “The demonization of the press leading to a shooting of the Press . . . Just horrible!!!!” Feminist writer Lauren Duca said on the same medium, “The shooting . . . cannot reasonably be separated from the President’s mission to villainize [sic] the press.” Reuters editor Rob Cox wrote, “This is what happens when @RealDonaldTrump calls journalists the enemy of the people. Blood is on your hands, Mr. President.” The Wire mastermind David Simon, a longtime Maryland newspaperman, tweeted at the president, “Blood today in an American newsroom. Aren’t you proud, you vile, fascist son of a bitch,” adding later that “Trump’s direct language was to blame.” Leftist commentators Jessica Valenti and Shaun King expressed similar sentiments. (Trump’s “enemy of the people” crack Monday was such a glancing aside that Chris Cillizza of CNN didn’t even include it in his exhaustive retrospective piece, “The 55 most over-the-top lines from Donald Trump’s South Carolina Speech.” Nor did the New York Times writeup of the rally mention it.)
Within just a few hours these observers found themselves humiliated by facts. Few of them apologized; instead they tried haplessly to argue that Trump still kinda-sorta bore some responsibility for the mindset of the shooter, who by 2012 had been labeled by the then-publisher of the paper attacked as someone inclined to come to the newsroom and “blow us all away.” Such is Trumpism that it has the capability to turn back time and retroactively make people enraged about matters completely unaffiliated with national politics. That Trump is at the bottom of nearly any given horrible event is an unfalsifiable proposition to the Left.


So as news of the shooting broke late Thursday there was, as Jonah Goldberg has dubbed the phenomenon, a race to be the first to be wrong. There was a desperate sprint to break the tape at the fools’ finish line. The air crackled sickly with the sound of ankles being shattered in the group jump to conclusions. None of these great minds troubled themselves to wonder why a Trump-inspired attacker would go after a local paper, not a national one, that has no especial reputation for any political stance or for antagonizing the president in the first place.


Why do so many bright people risk looking silly when they could just wait for some facts to emerge? Waiting is easy, and in the case of interpreting the meaning of breaking news events, waiting is wise. If their suspicions had proven correct, they would have had plenty of time to make their points afterwards. It appears that they just couldn’t help themselves.
I have all due sympathy for people who have actually lost control of their behavior and their thoughts — addicts, the suicidal, schizophrenics. But I couldn’t help thinking that many of these self-misguiding people are probably perfectly functional in every other area of their lives except when it comes to Trump. Trump is the bucket of water on the Left’s circuit board. He is the mind Ebola that has caused mass viral cerebral malfunction, again and again and again. Trump delights in being the cause of error, and yet nearly every week brings another instance of paid-up members of the national thought leadership club going cognitively spastic as if doing his bidding.
Do David Simon, Jessica Valenti, Randi Weingarten, et al. actually think that an otherwise normal, law-abiding citizen would be driven to mass murder by Trump’s half-serious jibes at the press? If so, why did they not also raise the alarm when Hillary Clinton, asked during a debate viewed by millions which enemy she was proudest of making, replied “the Republicans”? Why did they shrug (or cheer) in 2012 when President Obama called upon Americans to “punish our enemies,” meaning, presumably, Republicans? There are a lot more Republicans than journalists in this country. If publicly denouncing a group as “enemies” constitutes incitement to violence, should you not be more disturbed the larger that group is? Most people, after all, don’t normally encounter a journalist every day. There are only a few tens of thousands of them in the entire country. But almost everyone regularly crosses the path of a Republican or one of the 60 million Trump voters. Should I have felt threatened when both Obama and Clinton dubbed me an enemy of their people, the ones who outnumber mine in my county by a factor of nine to one?
I didn’t. As for Donald Trump, he mocked me by name in his book Crippled America (page 143). Fair enough; I’d written a column predicting he’d never run for president. If anyone should feel threatened by his rhetoric, it’s journalists like me whom he has personally heckled, not random small-market newspaper journalists with whom he has never interacted. I don’t feel particularly endangered. I think America takes Trump’s various ventures in trolling in the spirit they are offered — insult comedy, stray voltage, bloviation for the fans to jeer along with from the cheap seats. Is it presidential? Of course not. But it isn’t Hitlerian either. It’s more Vince McMahonian.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   6/30/2018, 11:03 am

Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter had deep, dark links to the alt-right
Quote :
In Jarrod Ramos’ disturbing Twitter history, numerous far-right links and hints of violence against journalists

Paul Rosenberg
June 30, 2018 10:00am (UTC)
When the identity of the apparent gunman in the massacre of five journalists in Annapolis, Maryland, was revealed, area resident John Hutson, a retired Navy admiral who is now a prominent consultant and writer, had a shock of recognition. The suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had contacted Hutson in March 2015, taunting him about his role in alerting law enforcement and thwarting a potential mass killer who threatened schoolchildren and Jews in far-away Montana.

That first individual in Montana, David Lenio, overflowed with hyperbolic threats, and Hutson’s efforts to stop him succeeded, as I reported at Salon, just after it happened. Ramos was more cryptic less overtly demonstrative—but in the end, far more deadlier. Both were somewhat enigmatic, angry loners, with an unmistakable affinity for the racist alt-right.

“Jarrod Ramos was a lone nut who was not politically motivated, but he was politically influenced by the alt-right,” Hutson told Salon.

Researcher Fred Clarkson agrees. “Ramos and David Lenio seem to have been drawn into the orbit of far-right visions of anti-democratic violence, even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:

“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.  

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:

Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’s tweet seemed over the top as well:

In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge against. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series, called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had  gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people.  This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:

These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

   In the court documents Ramos referred to himself as an agent of the Inquisition, and a crusader who cannot be killed. The Inquisition was a holy inquiry, where church authority superseded that of the civil authority. A crusader is the hand of God, waging a holy war, in the same way that the Charlie Hebdo massacres were. [In the documents] Ramos appeals to "higher authority," and he capitalizes "Higher Authority." This is similar to the way that the violent wing of the anti-abortion movement has appealed to "Higher Law," which they capitalize, to justify homicide against providers of safe, legal abortion, as well as judges and political figures who support the right.

Clarkson sees this tying back to Peroutka’s old allies at the League of the South. “Ramos came to see himself as some kind of vigilante for righteousness, casting himself for example as a 'crusader' and gunning down innocent people in a newsroom," Clarkson said, which "is not unlike the militaristic, millennial vision of Michael Hill, president of the League of the South.” Clarkson said. “Last year [Hill] rallied what he calls the Southern Defense Force, which he envisions as not just a modern Confederate army but the ‘Army of the True Living God.’ This is the group that played a prominent role in the Unite the Right march on Charlottesville.”

Hutson links these violent longings to Ramos' aristocratic pretensions. “His writing style is very arch. He appears to be writing what he conceives of as literature. His speech is highly stylized and idiosyncratic, and uses the metaphors of a holy war. A sense of embitterment and homicidal ideation comes through clearly. He writes about literal carnage, making clear that ... he means this in a literal sense. So it's not for nothing that you think about people like the Army of God.”

Ramos wasn’t acting on anyone’s orders, and despite his apparent linkages to white supremacy never expressed any clear political ideology. But there's little doubt he was influenced and shape by some of the darkest forces in our society.
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy who was a  law abiding responsible gun owner right up to the minute he pulled the trigger.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/06/media-bias-annapolis-shooting/

The Race to Be Wrong First about Annapolis
By Kyle Smith

June 29, 2018 5:14 PM
Dumbkin Trumpkin to to the rescue affraid
Quote :
Kyle Smith (born 1966) is an American critic, novelist, and essayist. He is a former film critic[1] for the New York Post.[2] and is currently critic-at-large at National Review. A writer in Entertainment Weekly described Smith's film-reviewing style "an exercise in hilarious hostility." [3]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyle_Smith"]
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happy jack

avatar

Posts : 6594

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   6/30/2018, 8:16 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter had deep, dark links to the alt-right
Quote :
In Jarrod Ramos’ disturbing Twitter history, numerous far-right links and hints of violence against journalists

Paul Rosenberg
June 30, 2018 10:00am (UTC)
When the identity of the apparent gunman in the massacre of five journalists in Annapolis, Maryland, was revealed, area resident John Hutson, a retired Navy admiral who is now a prominent consultant and writer, had a shock of recognition. The suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had contacted Hutson in March 2015, taunting him about his role in alerting law enforcement and thwarting a potential mass killer who threatened schoolchildren and Jews in far-away Montana.

That first individual in Montana, David Lenio, overflowed with hyperbolic threats, and Hutson’s efforts to stop him succeeded, as I reported at Salon, just after it happened. Ramos was more cryptic less overtly demonstrative—but in the end, far more deadlier. Both were somewhat enigmatic, angry loners, with an unmistakable affinity for the racist alt-right.

“Jarrod Ramos was a lone nut who was not politically motivated, but he was politically influenced by the alt-right,” Hutson told Salon.

Researcher Fred Clarkson agrees. “Ramos and David Lenio seem to have been drawn into the orbit of far-right visions of anti-democratic violence, even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:

“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.  

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:

Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’s tweet seemed over the top as well:

In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge against. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series, called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had  gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people.  This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:

These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

   In the court documents Ramos referred to himself as an agent of the Inquisition, and a crusader who cannot be killed. The Inquisition was a holy inquiry, where church authority superseded that of the civil authority. A crusader is the hand of God, waging a holy war, in the same way that the Charlie Hebdo massacres were. [In the documents] Ramos appeals to "higher authority," and he capitalizes "Higher Authority." This is similar to the way that the violent wing of the anti-abortion movement has appealed to "Higher Law," which they capitalize, to justify homicide against providers of safe, legal abortion, as well as judges and political figures who support the right.

Clarkson sees this tying back to Peroutka’s old allies at the League of the South. “Ramos came to see himself as some kind of vigilante for righteousness, casting himself for example as a 'crusader' and gunning down innocent people in a newsroom," Clarkson said, which "is not unlike the militaristic, millennial vision of Michael Hill, president of the League of the South.” Clarkson said. “Last year [Hill] rallied what he calls the Southern Defense Force, which he envisions as not just a modern Confederate army but the ‘Army of the True Living God.’ This is the group that played a prominent role in the Unite the Right march on Charlottesville.”

Hutson links these violent longings to Ramos' aristocratic pretensions. “His writing style is very arch. He appears to be writing what he conceives of as literature. His speech is highly stylized and idiosyncratic, and uses the metaphors of a holy war. A sense of embitterment and homicidal ideation comes through clearly. He writes about literal carnage, making clear that ... he means this in a literal sense. So it's not for nothing that you think about people like the Army of God.”

Ramos wasn’t acting on anyone’s orders, and despite his apparent linkages to white supremacy never expressed any clear political ideology. But there's little doubt he was influenced and shape by some of the darkest forces in our society.
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy who was a  law abiding responsible gun owner right up to the minute he pulled the trigger.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/06/media-bias-annapolis-shooting/

The Race to Be Wrong First about Annapolis
By Kyle Smith

June 29, 2018 5:14 PM
Dumbkin Trumpkin to to the rescue affraid
Quote :
Kyle Smith (born 1966) is an American critic, novelist, and essayist. He is a former film critic[1] for the New York Post.[2] and is currently critic-at-large at National Review. A writer in Entertainment Weekly described Smith's film-reviewing style "an exercise in hilarious hostility." [3]



Artchel60438 wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyle_Smith

This article contains wording that promotes the subject in a subjective manner without imparting real information.

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Artie60438



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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   7/1/2018, 10:33 am

Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
Exclusive: Accused Annapolis shooter had deep, dark links to the alt-right
Quote :
In Jarrod Ramos’ disturbing Twitter history, numerous far-right links and hints of violence against journalists

Paul Rosenberg
June 30, 2018 10:00am (UTC)
When the identity of the apparent gunman in the massacre of five journalists in Annapolis, Maryland, was revealed, area resident John Hutson, a retired Navy admiral who is now a prominent consultant and writer, had a shock of recognition. The suspect, Jarrod Ramos, had contacted Hutson in March 2015, taunting him about his role in alerting law enforcement and thwarting a potential mass killer who threatened schoolchildren and Jews in far-away Montana.

That first individual in Montana, David Lenio, overflowed with hyperbolic threats, and Hutson’s efforts to stop him succeeded, as I reported at Salon, just after it happened. Ramos was more cryptic less overtly demonstrative—but in the end, far more deadlier. Both were somewhat enigmatic, angry loners, with an unmistakable affinity for the racist alt-right.

“Jarrod Ramos was a lone nut who was not politically motivated, but he was politically influenced by the alt-right,” Hutson told Salon.

Researcher Fred Clarkson agrees. “Ramos and David Lenio seem to have been drawn into the orbit of far-right visions of anti-democratic violence, even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

“To oversimplify, the primary targets will not be enemy soldiers;” Hill wrote, “instead, they will be political leaders, members of the hostile media, cultural icons, bureaucrats, and other of the managerial elite without whom the engines of tyranny don’t run.”

Ramos first contacted Hutson through Twitter, the latter recalls, after "the Capital Gazette published a piece about how I had alerted the FBI about mass shooting threat suspect David Lenio,” Hutson said.

After Hutson tweeted about the story, Ramos tweeted a couple of disturbing responses, first asking “Were any school children intimidated?” then claiming that Lenio “had won”:

“The piece highlighted the fact that I was also researching and writing about Michael Peroutka, for example, in the pages of Huffington Post,” Hutson noted. “I documented Michael Peroutka’s support for the League of the South [here], a right-wing group that advocated death squads, assassinating journalists, elected officials, and other members of the elite,” he explained. He questioned and challenged Peroutka "about his support for the League of the South, and that led to a lot of public attention,” which he also wrote about for Huffington Post.  

Although Ramos didn’t contact Hutson at the time, he was clearly not pleased with the critical coverage of Peroutka, fusing his own lawsuit-fueled enmity toward the Capital Gazette with his enthusiasm for the pro-Confederate candidate:

Ramos was also given to self-inflation, putting on both literary and moralistic airs. In court documents, Hutson noted, he referred to himself as a crusader. Like his hero, Peroutka, this would effectively place himself above ordinary human law.

“His defense of Michael Peroutka is particularly interesting, since his views seem to echo Peroutka, a local politician and think tank leader, and other elements of the theocratic far right,” Clarkson added.

When Peroutka did manage a narrow victory that November — with signs that illegal robocalls helped put him over the top, Ramos’s tweet seemed over the top as well:

In fairness, none of Ramos' tweets overtly screams “potential mass murderer.” They’re indicative of someone stewing in resentment, but that’s hardly unusual in this day and age. Except for his Twitter avatar — that’s a whole different story.

“The image used in Ramos' Twitter profile is an image not of himself," Hutson observes, but of former Capital Gazette columnist Eric Hartley, against whom Ramos held a grudge against. “He placed a symbol on Hartley’s forehead and the symbol is a brand of sacrifice, marking a target for ritual murder,” Hutson explained. “It may have Celtic origins, but it is used in a Japanese manga series, called ‘Berserk,’ and it’s called ‘the brand of sacrifice.’

“For years Ramos stewed in his embitterment, over the newspaper's coverage of his unsuccessful defamation case and the newspaper's coverage of his stalking by Facebook of a woman with whom he had  gone to high school. But he didn't act,” Huston summed up. “So the question is, what triggered him?”

Several things are worth considering, Hutson suggested. “Ramos tweeted about only two political figures, Trump and Michael Peroutka -- but he also tweeted to me after the Capital Gazette had written about me.”

The content of that story was significant. That was when Hutson wrote about Peroutka's ties to the League of the South, and its support of "death squads to assassinate journalists." These were all pieces of a puzzle Ramos had been playing around with for years, Hutson believes.

“So what happened this past week?” Hutson asked. “On June 25, Trump – at his South Carolina rally – pointed to members of the media, and called them the enemy of the people.  This is a phrase that throughout history has been used by autocrats to incite violence,” from ancient Rome to the French Revolution to Nazi Germany.

That's not all that occurred last week, Hutson noted. On Tuesday, Peroutka, an Anne Arundel County councilman, was defeated for re-election, losing in the Republican primary to a female challenger. That may not be coincidental, Hutson suspects.

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:

These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

   In the court documents Ramos referred to himself as an agent of the Inquisition, and a crusader who cannot be killed. The Inquisition was a holy inquiry, where church authority superseded that of the civil authority. A crusader is the hand of God, waging a holy war, in the same way that the Charlie Hebdo massacres were. [In the documents] Ramos appeals to "higher authority," and he capitalizes "Higher Authority." This is similar to the way that the violent wing of the anti-abortion movement has appealed to "Higher Law," which they capitalize, to justify homicide against providers of safe, legal abortion, as well as judges and political figures who support the right.

Clarkson sees this tying back to Peroutka’s old allies at the League of the South. “Ramos came to see himself as some kind of vigilante for righteousness, casting himself for example as a 'crusader' and gunning down innocent people in a newsroom," Clarkson said, which "is not unlike the militaristic, millennial vision of Michael Hill, president of the League of the South.” Clarkson said. “Last year [Hill] rallied what he calls the Southern Defense Force, which he envisions as not just a modern Confederate army but the ‘Army of the True Living God.’ This is the group that played a prominent role in the Unite the Right march on Charlottesville.”

Hutson links these violent longings to Ramos' aristocratic pretensions. “His writing style is very arch. He appears to be writing what he conceives of as literature. His speech is highly stylized and idiosyncratic, and uses the metaphors of a holy war. A sense of embitterment and homicidal ideation comes through clearly. He writes about literal carnage, making clear that ... he means this in a literal sense. So it's not for nothing that you think about people like the Army of God.”

Ramos wasn’t acting on anyone’s orders, and despite his apparent linkages to white supremacy never expressed any clear political ideology. But there's little doubt he was influenced and shape by some of the darkest forces in our society.
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy who was a  law abiding responsible gun owner right up to the minute he pulled the trigger.

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/06/media-bias-annapolis-shooting/

The Race to Be Wrong First about Annapolis
By Kyle Smith

June 29, 2018 5:14 PM
Dumbkin Trumpkin to to the rescue affraid
Quote :
Kyle Smith (born 1966) is an American critic, novelist, and essayist. He is a former film critic[1] for the New York Post.[2] and is currently critic-at-large at National Review. A writer in Entertainment Weekly described Smith's film-reviewing style "an exercise in hilarious hostility." [3]



Artchel60438 wrote:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyle_Smith

This article contains wording that promotes the subject in a subjective manner without imparting real information.
1) Your source is still nothing more than a minor film critic

2) More importantly his opinion piece addresses none of the facts I presented in the Salon.com article

3)Finally we have even more proof that you're nothing more than a Trump Worshiping troll

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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   7/1/2018, 11:19 am

Artchel60438 wrote:
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyle_Smith

This article contains wording that promotes the subject in a subjective manner without imparting real information.

Artchel60438 wrote:
Your source is still nothing more than a minor film critic



And your source contains no real information, which was clear from the first sentence of the piece.
Of course, that shouldn't be too surprising, as you often knowingly make posts containing no real information.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   7/2/2018, 10:56 am

Artchel60438 wrote:
    .... even as they seem to have ultimately acted on their own,” said Clarkson, a senior research analyst with Political Research Associates, a progressive think tank in Somerville, Massachusetts.

.........

There are also darker long-simmering elements that may have helped prepare the way. Hutson sees an “overall pattern" of "homicidal ideation," starting with Ramous replacing the bloody severed head in a famous Charlie Hebdo cartoon with the face of Garrett Hartley, the Capital Gazette columnist:

Ramos was actually recycling an even earlier image, which was even less coherent:

Ramos also tweeted at Capital Gazette editor Rick Hutzell, criticizing him for relegating coverage of the Charlie Hebdo massacre in Paris to page 2. Then he wrote, “je suis CapGazNews.” a direct reference to the hashtag that followed the Charlie Hebdo massacre. As Hutson reads this, Ramos was already thinking of a mass shooting at Capital Gazette in the context of his reflections on Charlie Hebdo:


These aren’t the only such messages, either. As early as September 2014, there’s this one, citing the Capital Gazette's Annapolis address:

But after the Charlie Hebdo attack, Ramos' obsession appeared to become more intense, combining political and religious overtones. “Ramos had a website in which he published court documents from his unsuccessful defamation suit,” Hutson said, and the material reads more like psychodrama than legal briefs:

 
Artchel60438 wrote:
So Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy ....

happy jack wrote:
Within just a few hours these observers found themselves humiliated by facts. Few of them apologized; instead they tried haplessly to argue that Trump still kinda-sorta bore some responsibility for the mindset of the shooter, who by 2012 had been labeled by the then-publisher of the paper attacked as someone inclined to come to the newsroom and “blow us all away.” Such is Trumpism that it has the capability to turn back time and retroactively make people enraged about matters completely unaffiliated with national politics. That Trump is at the bottom of nearly any given horrible event is an unfalsifiable proposition to the Left.

So, no - not "Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy ....".
Pay attention.
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Artie60438



Posts : 9729

PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   7/2/2018, 2:42 pm

Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:

So, no - not "Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy ....".
Pay attention.
As we are all painfully aware you are too lazy to actually read what is posted.
Quote :
The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

Pay Attention indeed!

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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: The Religion of Peace - Too Dangerous to Criticize   7/2/2018, 3:49 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
Trump Worshiping Stooge wrote:

So, no - not "Another Mass Murder perpetrated by a Trump Worshiping angry white guy ....".
Pay attention.
As we are all painfully aware you are too lazy to actually read what is posted.
Quote :
The only two politicians Ramos had tweeted about, according to Hutson, were Donald Trump and Michael Peroutka, a wealthy neo-Confederate funder turned Maryland county councilman. Hutson has written about Peroutka, as have I. Peroutka had major funding ties to former Alabama judge and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore, as well to the League of the South, whose leader, Michael Hill, had written approvingly about plans to form paramilitary groups to fight a militarized “fourth generation” culture war, one of whose targets would be the media.

Pay Attention indeed!

Sleep

Tweeting someone's name is a very, very far cry from committing mass murder in that person's name, and a far cry from making that person in any way culpable for the mass murder.
Ramos had dangerous tendencies long before Trump was on the scene.
So, yeah - pay attention.
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