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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 10:53 am

Artie60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:
 

Over the course of three months, St. Louis County Prosecuting Atty. Robert McCulloch asked the jury of nine whites and three blacks to hear virtually every piece of evidence in the case: witnesses who both supported and contradicted police Officer Darren Wilson's account, three autopsy reports, bloodstains and shell casings.
"Our only goal was that our investigation would be thorough and complete, to give the grand jury, the Department of Justice and ultimately the public all available evidence," McCulloch said in announcing that the jury had found no probable cause to bring Wilson to trial on criminal charges.
………

In the Ferguson case, several analysts said, the decision to present all available evidence essentially meant that jurors heard from witnesses both favorable and hostile to a prosecution. It provided an unusual opportunity for jurors to have doubts about whether there was probable cause for an indictment.

First, you demand transparency.
Then, when you get transparency, you whine about it.
Perhaps you'll begin to see things more clearly as soon as you stop weeping uncontrollably over the outcome of this situation.

The whole thing was a sham especially with the decision to allow defendant Wilson to testify for four hours.



When someone’s life and/or freedom are at stake, don’t you think that, for the sake of justice, it is better to have too much information rather than too little? Or did you not have any interest in actual justice, but rather wanted an indictment at all costs, regardless of the facts?
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 11:27 am

happy jack wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:

The whole thing was a sham especially with the decision to allow defendant Wilson to testify for four hours.[/b]

[b]When someone’s life and/or freedom are at stake, don’t you think that, for the sake of justice, it is better to have too much information rather than too little? Or did you not have any interest in actual justice, but rather wanted an indictment at all costs, regardless of the facts?
It's obvious from the way the GJ was run that the prosecutor did not want to get an indictment.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 12:41 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Artie60438 wrote:

The whole thing was a sham especially with the decision to allow defendant Wilson to testify for four hours.[/b]

When someone’s life and/or freedom are at stake, don’t you think that, for the sake of justice, it is better to have too much information rather than too little? Or did you not have any interest in actual justice, but rather wanted an indictment at all costs, regardless of the facts?

It's obvious from the way the GJ was run that the prosecutor did not want to get an indictment.




Neither of us has any way of knowing what was in the prosecutor’s mind, but it’s possible that he didn’t want to be handed a case that he would be certain to lose.
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 2:33 pm

Wilson Witness who corroborates the "Charge" claim, wrote Racist Journal Entries
Quote :

The key issue in the Michael Brown shooting case has always been, when the final and fatal shots were fired, was he an active threat to the officer? He had already fled and run away over 148 feet, but when he stopped and turned was it to surrender—as several witnesses told the press—or was it to charge as Officer Wilson claimed?

There is one witness who backed up Wilson's claim, and that witness also wrote the following in her journal on the day of the shooting.
Quote :

"Well I'm gonna take my random drive to Florissant. Need to understand the Black race better so I stop calling Blacks Niggers and Start calling them People."

Why exactly in the world is this the witness that has credibility, but so many others—including the set of construction workers who immediately reacted to shooting that "his hands were up"?—somehow don't?

via CNN

Quote :
An exclusive video captures their reactions during the moments just after the shooting.

"He had his f*n hands up," one of the men says in the video.

The man told CNN he heard one gunshot, then another shot about 30 seconds later.

"The cop didn't say get on the ground. He just kept shooting," the man said.

That same witness described the gruesome scene, saying he saw Brown's "brains come out of his head," again stating, "his hands were up."

The video shows the man raising his arms in the air—just as, he says, Brown was doing when he was shot.

But despite this video—which was taken literally seconds after the shooting—we had a grand jury that instead took seriously the testimony of a person who admitted, in their own private diary, to calling black people "Ni*ers" instead of "people," on a regular basis.

Quote :
In a subsequent entry that same day following the shooting, the same witness wrote in his or her journal about seeing the shooting incident: "The cop got out left hand on face Right hand on gun. The Cop Screamed but I could not understand. Everyone was Screaming ... The big kid turned around had his arms out with attitude. The cop just stood there dang if that kid didn't start running right at the cop like a foot ball player Head down. I heard 3 bangs but the big kid wouldn't Stop ... Cop took a couple steps forward then backwards and the gun went off 2 more times. The last one on the top of the kids head. OMG the blood."

If we are to take what District Attorney Robert McCulloch said in during his press conference Monday that "All the ones that I mentioned specifically were all African-Americans, were the ones who came at him in a full charge" then that meant this person was too. And as far as I'm concerned that doesn't change anything.

If they have an anti-Black bias, then they have a anti-Black bias, period, and their credibility shouldn't have been valued above all the other witnesses, including the construction workers who were white.
How convenient that a racist decided to take a "random drive" and then becomes a witness. Shocked Had there been an indictment the cross examination would have have been interesting to say the least.
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Scorpion

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 3:30 pm

I have a question that I hope one of you can answer.  There seems to be conflicting accounts of this story.  First, we hear that Brown was over 125 feet from Wilson before he turned around.  Now, if he simply turned around and put his hands up, wouldn't he have fallen 125 feet from Wilson?  How is it that the last shot was fired when Brown was only 20 feet away or so?
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 8:23 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
Wilson Witness who corroborates the "Charge" claim, wrote Racist Journal Entries
Quote :

The key issue in the Michael Brown shooting case has always been, when the final and fatal shots were fired, was he an active threat to the officer?  He had already fled and run away over 148 feet, but when he stopped and turned was it to surrender—as several witnesses told the press—or was it to charge as Officer Wilson claimed?

There is one witness who backed up Wilson's claim, and that witness also wrote the following in her journal on the day of the shooting.
Quote :

   "Well I'm gonna take my random drive to Florissant. Need to understand the Black race better so I stop calling Blacks Niggers and Start calling them People."

Why exactly in the world is this the witness that has credibility, but so many others—including the set of construction workers who immediately reacted to shooting that "his hands were up"?—somehow don't?

via CNN

 
Quote :
An exclusive video captures their reactions during the moments just after the shooting.

   "He had his f*n hands up," one of the men says in the video.

   The man told CNN he heard one gunshot, then another shot about 30 seconds later.

   "The cop didn't say get on the ground. He just kept shooting," the man said.

   That same witness described the gruesome scene, saying he saw Brown's "brains come out of his head," again stating, "his hands were up."

   The video shows the man raising his arms in the air—just as, he says, Brown was doing when he was shot.

But despite this video—which was taken literally seconds after the shooting—we had a grand jury that instead took seriously the testimony of a person who admitted, in their own private diary, to calling black people "Ni*ers" instead of "people," on a regular basis.

Quote :
   In a subsequent entry that same day following the shooting, the same witness wrote in his or her journal about seeing the shooting incident: "The cop got out left hand on face Right hand on gun. The Cop Screamed but I could not understand. Everyone was Screaming ... The big kid turned around had his arms out with attitude. The cop just stood there dang if that kid didn't start running right at the cop like a foot ball player Head down. I heard 3 bangs but the big kid wouldn't Stop ... Cop took a couple steps forward then backwards and the gun went off 2 more times. The last one on the top of the kids head. OMG the blood."

If we are to take what District Attorney Robert McCulloch said in during his press conference Monday that "All the ones that I mentioned specifically were all African-Americans, were the ones who came at him in a full charge" then that meant this person was too. And as far as I'm concerned that doesn't change anything.

If they have an anti-Black bias, then they have a anti-Black bias, period, and their credibility shouldn't have been valued above all the other witnesses, including the construction workers who were white.
How convenient that a racist decided to take a "random drive" and then becomes a witness. Shocked  Had there been an indictment the cross examination would have have been interesting to say the least.



It has been my understanding that it is perfectly OK for blacks to refer to each other as niggers. (See Music: Rap) What has changed?


Last edited by happy jack on 11/26/2014, 8:43 pm; edited 1 time in total
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/26/2014, 8:30 pm

Scorpion wrote:
I have a question that I hope one of you can answer.  There seems to be conflicting accounts of this story.  First, we hear that Brown was over 125 feet from Wilson before he turned around.  Now, if he simply turned around and put his hands up, wouldn't he have fallen 125 feet from Wilson?  How is it that the last shot was fired when Brown was only 20 feet away or so?



If you have the time and patience, (which, unfortunately, I don't have at the moment) you might find some sort of answer to your question in here.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/25/us/evidence-released-in-michael-brown-case.html?_r=0

Sorry that I can't be more specific.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/27/2014, 7:18 pm

happy jack wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
I have a question that I hope one of you can answer.  There seems to be conflicting accounts of this story.  First, we hear that Brown was over 125 feet from Wilson before he turned around.  Now, if he simply turned around and put his hands up, wouldn't he have fallen 125 feet from Wilson?  How is it that the last shot was fired when Brown was only 20 feet away or so?



If you have the time and patience, (which, unfortunately, I don't have at the moment) you might find some sort of answer to your question in here.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2014/11/25/us/evidence-released-in-michael-brown-case.html?_r=0

Sorry that I can't be more specific.



Amendment to my last post:
Scorpion, I also wondered about the distance discrepancies; they were all over the map, and I have no idea which ones were accurate. If you happen to fall upon the truth, please let me know.
Thanks.

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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   11/30/2014, 6:02 pm

The Strange Ferguson Grand Jury
Quote :
You know the fix is in when a suspect who shot an unarmed man voluntarily provides four hours of un-cross-examined testimony to a grand jury without taking the Fifth.

On Aug. 9, Ferguson, Missouri Police Officer Darren Wilson gunned down 18-year-old African-American Michael Brown. Since that fateful day, people across the country have protested against racial profiling, excessive police force, and the failure of the criminal justice system to provide accountability.
The nail in the coffin of "equal justice under law" came on Nov. 24, when the St. Louis County grand jury refused to indict Wilson for any criminal charges in the shooting death of Brown. In a virtually unprecedented move, St. Louis Prosecutor Robert McCulloch in effect deputized the grand jurors to sit as triers of fact as in a jury trial.

In a normal grand jury proceeding, the prosecutor presents evidence for a few days and then asks the grand jurors to return an indictment, which they nearly always do. Of 162,000 federal cases in 2010, grand juries failed to indict in only 11 of them, according the Bureau of Justice Statistics.

The standard of proof for a grand jury to indict is only probable cause to believe the suspect committed a crime. It is not proof beyond a reasonable doubt, which is required for conviction at trial. Yet McCulloch's team presented testimony and documents to the panel for three months, evidence not subjected to adversarial testing by cross-examination.

Justice Antonin Scalia explained the function of the grand jury in United States v. Williams as follows:

Quote :
   "[I]t is the grand jury's function not 'to enquire ... upon what foundation [the charge may be] denied,' or otherwise to try the suspect's defenses, but only to examine 'upon what foundation [the charge] is made' by the prosecutor. [citations omitted] As a consequence, neither in this country nor in England has the suspect under investigation by the grand jury ever been thought to have a right to testify or to have exculpatory evidence presented."

Every principle Scalia cited was violated in this case. The grand jury was asked to determine whether Wilson acted in self-defense. Wilson was allowed to give four hours of self-serving testimony to the grand jury. And for three months, prosecutors presented both incriminating and exculpatory evidence.

The prosecutor did not ask these grand jurors for an indictment. They were left to sift through the evidence on their own, with no prosecutorial guidance about what to charge. Indeed, the transcripts indicated that prosecutors asked Wilson gentle, leading questions designed to bolster his self-defense claim. For example, a prosecutor told Wilson, "You felt like your life was in jeopardy," followed by, "And use of deadly force was justified at that point, in your opinion?" But prosecutors rigorously challenged witnesses who contradicted Wilson's testimony.

As the grand jury is a secret proceeding, with only the grand jurors and the prosecutor present, the grand jurors did not hear any cross-examination of the officer's testimony, or that of other witnesses (which is customary in an adversarial jury trial).

These grand jurors, who were nearing the end of their term, which began in May, knew the drill, since they had sat on several other cases. They knew the prosecutor always asks for indictments. Thus, when the prosecutor handled the Wilson case in a radically different manner, this signaled to the grand jurors that they were not expected to indict. And they did not.

Another unorthodox aspect of this case was McCulloch's announcement of the grand jury's decision on national television. Sounding like a defense attorney delivering a closing argument in a jury trial, McCulloch characterized and analyzed the witness testimony in the light most favorable to the officer.

McCulloch has a history of bias in favor of police involved in altercations with black men. But, ignoring the pleas of 7,000 residents in and near Ferguson who signed a petition, McCulloch refused to recuse himself in the Wilson case.

McCulloch had mischaracterized testimony in a 2000 case in which two black men were killed after officers fired 21 shots at them. As in the Wilson case, the reasonableness of the officers' use of deadly force was critical. In the 2000 case, the officers said the two victims were driving toward them, trying to run them down, and McCulloch claimed that all the witnesses corroborated the officers' story. A later federal investigation, however, determined that the car was not moving forward, and that only three of the 13 officers said the car was moving forward.

Likewise, Wilson's claim that Brown was "charging" at him when the officer fired the fatal shots into the top of Brown's bowed head was critical to the reasonableness of Wilson's use of deadly force. When McCulloch announced the grand jury's decision, he characterized the witnesses who testified that Brown was "charging" the officer as believable, but dismissed the testimony of witnesses who said Brown was surrendering. McCulloch sounded like a defense attorney, not a prosecutor charged with representing "the people," including Brown.

Wilson fired 12 shots at Brown, six of which struck the teenager. There was a great deal of contradiction among the witnesses, including whether Brown's hands were up or down when Wilson shot at him. That is precisely why there should have been an indictment and a jury trial. Jurors would hear all of the evidence, subjected to adversarial testing by cross-examination. They would assess the credibility of the witnesses, and determine whether Wilson had committed any crime(s) beyond a reasonable doubt.

After reviewing the transcripts and evidence in the Wilson case, San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi noted: "Dorian Johnson, the key witness who was standing next to Brown during the encounter, provided strong testimony that called into question Wilson's claim that he was defending his life against a deranged aggressor. Johnson testified that Wilson, enraged that the young men did not obey his order to get on the sidewalk, threw his patrol car into reverse.

Quote :
"While Wilson claimed Brown prevented him from opening his door, Johnson testified that the officer smacked them with the door after nearly hitting the pair. Johnson described the ensuing struggle as Wilson attempting to pull Brown through the car window by his neck and shirt, and Brown pulling away. Johnson never saw Brown reach for Wilson's gun or punch the officer. Johnson testified that he watched a wounded Brown partially raise his hands and say, 'I don't have a gun' before being fatally shot."

Adachi also wrote, "Prosecutors never asked Wilson why he did not attempt to drive away while Brown was allegedly reaching through his vehicle window or to reconcile the contradiction between his claim that Brown punched the left side of his face and the documented injuries which appear on his right side."

If properly directed, the grand jury may well have indicted Wilson for one of several offenses, including first-degree murder, second-degree murder, voluntary manslaughter, involuntary manslaughter, assault with a deadly weapon, unlawful discharge of a firearm, and battery. Wilson testified that he was acting in self-defense when he shot Brown. If he were indicted, the jury would assess whether Wilson acted reasonably when he used deadly force against the teenager.

A police officer in Missouri can use deadly force in making an arrest or preventing escape if he reasonably believes it is necessary to effect the arrest and also reasonably believes the person to be arrested has committed or attempted to commit a felony, or may otherwise endanger life or inflict serious physical injury unless arrested without delay. The key word is "reasonably."

The jury would be told to consider whether a deadly weapon was used, how far apart Wilson was from Brown when the former used deadly force, any disparities in the sizes of the two, the crime involved, etc. The evidence was contradictory about the distance between the two during the confrontation, both Wilson and Brown were the same height but Brown was heavier, and the officer contradicted himself about whether he knew that Brown was suspected of committing petty theft for stealing cigarillos (a misdemeanor, not a felony) before the officer stopped him.

In Tennessee v. Garner, the Supreme Court held that an officer cannot arrest an unarmed felony suspect by shooting him dead. If the suspect threatens the officer with a weapon, or there is probable cause to believe he has committed a crime involving the infliction or threatened infliction of serious physical harm, deadly force may be used if necessary to prevent escape. Although there is a dispute about whether Wilson knew that Brown was suspected of stealing cigarillos before stopping him, Brown had likely committed petty theft -- a non-violent misdemeanor, not a felony.

Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: "Why did Michael Brown, an 18-year-old kid headed to college, refuse to move from the middle of the street to the sidewalk? Why would he curse out a police officer? Why would he attack a police officer? Why would he dare a police officer to shoot him? Why would he charge a police officer holding a gun? Why would he put his hand in his waistband while charging, even though he was unarmed?"

In my opinion, McCulloch should have filed charges against Wilson, who would then have had the right to a public preliminary hearing. He could present evidence and cross-examine the witnesses against him. And if it were televised, the viewing public could see that justice is done.

According to Adachi, "Wilson's description of Brown as a 'demon' with superhuman strength and unremitting rage, and his description of the neighborhood as 'hostile,' illustrate implicit racial bias that taints use-of-force decisions. These biases surely contribute to the fact that African Americans are 21 times more likely to be shot by police than whites in the US, but the statement's racial implications remain unexamined."

Because of the great social implications of cases involving police shootings of people of color, the presumption in these cases should be that prosecutors utilize the public preliminary hearing process instead of the secret grand jury proceeding.

In a unified statement, several civil and human rights organizations recommended an independent and comprehensive federal investigation by the Department of Justice (DOJ). They said the DOJ should also investigate all police killings and reports of the use of excessive force and racial profiling against youth and people of color. And they would require Body-Worn Cameras to record every police-civilian encounter, and increased community oversight of local law enforcement.

Thousands of people in cities throughout the country are protesting the travesty of justice that occurred in Ferguson. But, as the civil and human rights organizations wrote in their statement, "Nothing will be resolved until there is a systemic change throughout this nation in the implicit and explicit bias against people of color and particularly African-American youth who are routinely targeted by law enforcement even within their own communities."
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/1/2014, 9:31 am

happy jack wrote:
 
Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: "Why did Michael Brown, an 18-year-old kid headed to college, refuse to move from the middle of the street to the sidewalk?”

Because he was a thug, as demonstrated in the convenience store video.

Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: " Why would he curse out a police officer?”

Because he was a thug, as demonstrated in the convenience store video.


Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: “Why would he attack a police officer?”

Because he was a thug, as demonstrated in the convenience store video.


Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: "Why would he dare a police officer to shoot him? "

Because he was a thug, as demonstrated in the convenience store video.


Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: " Why would he charge a police officer holding a gun?"

Because he was a thug, as demonstrated in the convenience store video.


Artie60438 wrote:
   
Wilson's testimony raises several questions, listed in a piece by Ezra Klein on Vox: " Why would he put his hand in his waistband while charging, even though he was unarmed?"

No idea. Perhaps his balls itched.





And I raised this question early in this thread:

happy jack wrote:

Think about it - why would an officer with (to the best of my knowledge) an unblemished record just suddenly decide to commit cold-blooded murder in broad daylight in front of witnesses? That makes no sense.
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/1/2014, 3:17 pm

happy jack wrote:

[b]No idea.
I see what I posted went over your head as usual. Nice waste of your time.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/1/2014, 3:56 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:

No idea.

I see what I posted went over your head as usual. Nice waste of your time.




You may whine all you want about it, but neither the prosecutor nor the grand jury had anything to do with the death of Michael Brown. The cause of Michael Brown's death is neatly distilled in my previous post.
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/1/2014, 10:11 pm

Scorpion wrote:
I have a question that I hope one of you can answer.  There seems to be conflicting accounts of this story.  First, we hear that Brown was over 125 feet from Wilson before he turned around.  Now, if he simply turned around and put his hands up, wouldn't he have fallen 125 feet from Wilson?  How is it that the last shot was fired when Brown was only 20 feet away or so?
According to this video he was 135 ft away.


Here is the article from where I found this. It's too lengthy including all the photographs to post the whole thing. Let me know what you think.
Video: Police lied. Mike Brown was killed 148 feet away from Darren Wilson's SUV
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Scorpion

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/8/2014, 10:00 pm

Thanks to both of you.   From the transcripts, I found that Brown fell 152.9 feet from Wilson's vehicle.  Wilson chased Brown, and fired several shots at him as Brown fled.

What really trips me out is that nobody felt that it was important how far apart the two were when the fatal shots were fired. (the crime camera's battery was dead.)  As a legal examiner said, no distance measurements were taken because they were "self explanatory."

Quote :
Somebody shot somebody.  There was no question as to any distance or anything of that nature at the time I was there.

That kind of indifference to essential facts is really unforgivable, in my book.
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Heretic

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/8/2014, 10:10 pm

Well shit.  That's even farther away than I thought, definitely farther away than police said.

So how is this not an attempted cover-up by the PD?  Clearly they handled this in the absolute worst possible way.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/9/2014, 8:59 am

Scorpion wrote:
Thanks to both of you.   From the transcripts, I found that Brown fell 152.9 feet from Wilson's vehicle.  Wilson chased Brown, and fired several shots at him as Brown fled.

What really trips me out is that nobody felt that it was important how far apart the two were when the fatal shots were fired. (the crime camera's battery was dead.)  As a legal examiner said, no distance measurements were taken because they were "self explanatory."




The distance between the two when the shots were fired is certainly more relevant than the distance between the body and the vehicle. That is an almost meaningless measurement.


A couple of interesting things I found poking around in the transcripts (Volume 2: September 3rd):


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/11/24/ferguson-evidence/assets/gj-testimony/grand-jury-volume-02.pdf


1. There is nothing unusual about leaving a body at the crime scene for four hours. It is, in fact, routine. (pp. 70 - 71)
2. The driver's side window of Wilson's vehicle had been broken from the outside. (pp. 112 - 113)
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/12/2014, 7:46 pm

http://michellemalkin.com/?p=161931

P.C.U.: College president apologizes for saying ‘all lives matter’

By Doug Powers  •  December 10, 2014 10:11 AM



No wonder The Onion is reportedly up for sale — there’s just no way to compete with real life anymore:
The president of prestigious Smith College is red-faced and apologetic Tuesday for telling students on the Northampton, Mass., campus that “all lives matter.”
Kathleen McCartney wrote the phrase in the subject line of an e-mail to students at the school, whose alumni include feminists Gloria Steinem and Betty Friedan, former First Lady Nancy Reagan and celebrity chef Julia Child. McCartney was attempting to show support for students protesting racially charged grand jury decisions in which police in Missouri and New York were not charged in the deaths of unarmed black men.
But she soon received backlash from students for her phrasing. They were offended that she did not stick with the slogan “black lives matter.”
The Daily Hampshire Gazette, which first covered the story, quoted one Smith sophomore, Cecelia Lim, as saying, “it felt like she was invalidating the experience of black lives.”
In response to student backlash, McCartney apologized in another campus-wide email Friday, saying she had made a mistake “despite my best intentions.”
If you’re keeping score at home, update your program to read “all lives don’t necessarily matter.”
Way to challenge those young minds and prepare them for the real world by not backing down from a slightly different point of view! Or maybe she was also concerned that those words could come back to haunt her if the subject of abortion comes up at the next faculty meeting.
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/13/2014, 10:31 am

happy jack wrote:
http://michellemalkin.com/?p=161931

P.C.U.: College president apologizes for saying ‘all lives matter’
Apparently the only ones interested in this are the wingnut tools that feed cranks like you.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/13/2014, 1:40 pm

Artie60438 wrote:
happy jack wrote:
http://michellemalkin.com/?p=161931

P.C.U.: College president apologizes for saying ‘all lives matter’
Apparently the only ones interested in this are the wingnut tools that feed cranks like you.



It clearly interested you enough to cause you to comment on it.
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Scorpion

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/15/2014, 4:25 pm

happy jack wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
Thanks to both of you.   From the transcripts, I found that Brown fell 152.9 feet from Wilson's vehicle.  Wilson chased Brown, and fired several shots at him as Brown fled.

What really trips me out is that nobody felt that it was important how far apart the two were when the fatal shots were fired. (the crime camera's battery was dead.)  As a legal examiner said, no distance measurements were taken because they were "self explanatory."




The distance between the two when the shots were fired is certainly more relevant than the distance between the body and the vehicle. That is an almost meaningless measurement.


A couple of interesting things I found poking around in the transcripts (Volume 2: September 3rd):


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/11/24/ferguson-evidence/assets/gj-testimony/grand-jury-volume-02.pdf


2. The driver's side window of Wilson's vehicle had been broken from the outside. (pp. 112 - 113)

Actually, it appears that the window was not "broken from  the outside."  

According to Wilson's own testimony,a shot that he fired while he was still in the vehicle shattered the window, which was rolled down at the time. (bullet went through the door and shattered the rolled down window in its frame)(page 224)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/11/24/ferguson-evidence/assets/gj-testimony/grand-jury-volume-05.pdf
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/15/2014, 4:49 pm

Scorpion wrote:
happy jack wrote:
Scorpion wrote:
Thanks to both of you.   From the transcripts, I found that Brown fell 152.9 feet from Wilson's vehicle.  Wilson chased Brown, and fired several shots at him as Brown fled.

What really trips me out is that nobody felt that it was important how far apart the two were when the fatal shots were fired. (the crime camera's battery was dead.)  As a legal examiner said, no distance measurements were taken because they were "self explanatory."




The distance between the two when the shots were fired is certainly more relevant than the distance between the body and the vehicle. That is an almost meaningless measurement.


A couple of interesting things I found poking around in the transcripts (Volume 2: September 3rd):


http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/11/24/ferguson-evidence/assets/gj-testimony/grand-jury-volume-02.pdf


2. The driver's side window of Wilson's vehicle had been broken from the outside. (pp. 112 - 113)

Actually, it appears that the window was not "broken from  the outside."  

According to Wilson's own testimony,a shot that he fired while he was still in the vehicle shattered the window, which was rolled down at the time. (bullet went through the door and shattered the rolled down window in its frame)(page 224)

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2014/11/24/ferguson-evidence/assets/gj-testimony/grand-jury-volume-05.pdf



Thanks, that makes a whole lot more sense, because all of the initial reports had Wilson grabbing Brown by sticking his arm out of an opened window.
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Heretic

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/21/2014, 9:38 am

Ferguson DA Interview: Says Some Witnesses Lied

Quote :
Ferguson DA Rob McCulloch broke his silence today. In an interview, he said that he thinks some grand jury witnesses lied.

Quote :
[McCulloch] acknowledged that witnesses he did not believe to be truthful had come before the jurors. Mr. McCulloch said that one female witness, who provided testimony that appeared to bolster Officer Wilson’s account of events, “clearly wasn’t present” when the shooting occurred.

....[He] added that the grand jury also heard from other witnesses whose testimony was also in doubt. “It went both directions,” he said.

McCulloch said he decided to let them testify even though he thought they were lying. . . .

He cited the maxim that the prosecutor's obligation is not to indict but to see justice done. What about the maxim that a lawyer shouldn't present testimony he believes to be perjured? Rule 4.3 of the Missouri Rules of Professional Conduct say:

Quote :
A lawyer shall not knowingly...offer evidence that the lawyer knows to be false.... A lawyer may refuse to offer evidence, other than the testimony of a defendant in a criminal matter, that the lawyer reasonably believes is false.

If he was going to be criticized anyway, why not decide to be criticized for doing the right thing and blocking untruthful testimony, rather than perpetuating it?

. . .

McCulloch justifies the decision to put her on as a witness not on the grounds that he was credible, but that he would have been criticized either way. Had he not put her on, Wilson's supporters and police would have been angry. By putting her on, it's Brown's supporters that are angry. I don't think the decision to call a witness before the grand jury should be based on who will be upset by your decision. It should be based on whether the prosecutor thinks the witness has relevant and credible information on the matter being investigated. Here, McCulloch did not. And he put her on anyway. Even if he's telling the truth he didn't call her to bolster Wilson's case, it's still a troubling decision.

They really need to set up special prosecutors for these types of cases. There's a definite vested interest not to indict if you have to work on a daily basis with the police department in question.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/21/2014, 11:36 am

This should make Artie’s day.
If the two officers had been white rather than ethnic minorities, it would have made his entire Christmas season!!!!
(Oooops! Sorry, Heretic - no offense intended; I meant to say Winter Holiday Period.)




http://www.wsj.com/articles/two-nypd-officers-shot-in-patrol-car-1419112127?mod=WSJ_hpp_LEFTTopStories

NYPD Shooting Suspect Referenced Garner, Brown Cases
Officers Were ‘Targeted for Their Uniform,’ Police Commissioner Says

By
PERVAIZ SHALLWANI
Updated Dec. 21, 2014 12:27 a.m. ET
1650 COMMENTS
Two New York City police officers were shot and killed by a gunman who ambushed their patrol car outside a Brooklyn housing project on Saturday, in what top city officials called a targeted killing.
“They were quite simply assassinated, targeted for their uniform,” Police Commissioner William Bratton said at a news conference at Woodhull Medical Center on Saturday evening.
The alleged gunman, Ismaaiyl Brinsley, was chased by other officers to the platform of a nearby subway station, where he committed suicide, police said. Officials have determined that Mr. Brinsley, 28 years old, started his day in the Baltimore area, where he allegedly shot a woman believed to be his former girlfriend before 6 a.m.
Mr. Bratton said police are investigating social-media postings in which Mr. Brinsley foreshadowed the killings and referenced Eric Garner and Michael Brown, two unarmed black men who recently died during encounters with white police officers. Authorities have said both men were resisting arrest.
Mr. Brinsley posted a photo of a silver handgun and a message on Instagram several hours before the shooting, according to law-enforcement officials. In a message that he said may be his last, he talked about killing police officers in retaliation for the deaths of Mr. Garner and Mr. Brown.
“Some of the postings…that are out there would seem to indicate that he had a very strong bias against police officers,” Mr. Bratton said. “As to a specific motivation, hopefully we will be able to determine that.”
The shooting has escalated tensions between New York MayorBill de Blasio and the police, which have been building since protests began last month over the Brown and Garner deaths.
The shooting occurred around 2:45 p.m. as officers Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu sat in their patrol vehicle keeping watch over the Tompkins Houses, as part of a crime-reduction effort launched in May following an uptick in shootings at city housing projects, particularly those in Brooklyn, police said.
Officer Ramos was in the driver’s seat. Officer Liu was in the front passenger seat, Mr. Bratton said.
Mr. Brinsley walked up to the police car, took a “shooting stance” on the passenger side of the car and fired several shots through the front passenger window, striking both officers in the head, Mr. Bratton said.
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Artie60438

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/21/2014, 6:10 pm

Heretic wrote:

They really need to set up special prosecutors for these types of cases.  There's a definite vested interest not to indict if you have to work on a daily basis with the police department in question.
The fix was in from day 1.
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happy jack

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PostSubject: Re: #Ferguson,Mo   12/22/2014, 12:52 am

Artie60438 wrote:
Heretic wrote:

They really need to set up special prosecutors for these types of cases.  There's a definite vested interest not to indict if you have to work on a daily basis with the police department in question.
The fix was in from day 1.



Yes, from Day 1, they were out to get Michael Brown, even before he robbed and violently attacked a perfectly innocent store proprietor, and even before he attacked a police officer.    

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