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 LEED certification of Centennial park

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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 8:20 am

Looks like an interesting program that's a good place to start.


Last edited by Bill B on 1/8/2009, 8:25 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : found what I missed)
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 8:36 am

Bill B wrote:
Looks like an interesting program that's a good place to start.
Sometimes works. Sometimes NOT. Ever hear of Sick Building Syndrome? Sometimes you can go too far.
Still waiting for sparks to enlighten us. So far he just cuts and pastes or relays what his friends tell him.

Hint to sparks: I'm a specifications writer and financial adviser for an architectural firm specializing in school design and construction.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 10:12 am

Bill B wrote:
Looks like an interesting program that's a good place to start.

Sure its a start, but the things they do are not efficient at all

when you are continually energizing lights over and over, there is no savings, when you have a old toilet that uses 5 gallons to flush, and you install a toilet that uses 2 gallons, and have to flush it 3 times to get every thing down, you are using 1 more gallon of water. No saving

Low flow water shower heads? I had an apartment that had them, and guess what, instead of being able to take a shower in 10 minutes, it took me 20 minutes because the pressure was so low, it took longer to wash and rinse. No savings there when I used more water.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 10:32 am

Are those automatic toilets suppose to be "green" cuz I tell ya, I hate dem things. They'll flush right in the middle of going (sorry I'm really not trying to be crude). Seems to me it's a waste of water when it continues to flush over and over. Unless those are just used for sanitary or convenience means?
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 10:39 am

Ohhmama wrote:
Are those automatic toilets suppose to be "green" cuz I tell ya, I hate dem things. They'll flush right in the middle of going (sorry I'm really not trying to be crude). Seems to me it's a waste of water when it continues to flush over and over. Unless those are just used for sanitary or convenience means?

Potty Mouth Shocked
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 10:39 am

LOL, sorry Wink
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 11:02 am

Ohhmama wrote:
Are those automatic toilets suppose to be "green" cuz I tell ya, I hate dem things. They'll flush right in the middle of going (sorry I'm really not trying to be crude). Seems to me it's a waste of water when it continues to flush over and over. Unless those are just used for sanitary or convenience means?

depends

some are, some are not

some are just automatic
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 1:41 pm

Ohhmama wrote:
Are those automatic toilets suppose to be "green" cuz I tell ya, I hate dem things. They'll flush right in the middle of going (sorry I'm really not trying to be crude). Seems to me it's a waste of water when it continues to flush over and over. Unless those are just used for sanitary or convenience means?

Add me to the list...I can't tell you how many times I got "squirted" off the rim. affraid

It's gotten so bad I wave my hand over it just to see if it's rigged wrong.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 4:47 pm

Actually I was looking at the cert. for homes.
One thing that does concern me is points for rafter/joist/framing on larger than 16" on center. But I'm not a carpenter.
My wife and I are working on what "features" we want built into our next home (in AZ) and this might yield some good ideas.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 5:54 pm

Bill B wrote:
Actually I was looking at the cert. for homes.
One thing that does concern me is points for rafter/joist/framing on larger than 16" on center. But I'm not a carpenter.
My wife and I are working on what "features" we want built into our next home (in AZ) and this might yield some good ideas.
Prefabricated roof trusses, properly engineered, can be placed 24" on center, depending on the clear span. As for floor joists, the prefabricated joists (looks a lot like smallish I-Beams) can also be placed 24" on center, again depending on span. What you do need to watch (not so much with the roof trusses) are the loads that you will have on the floors, like cast iron stoves, hot tubs, aquariums, and etc. Depending on the location in Arizona, the trusses must be designed and sloped properly if you are in an area that gets some snow.

Just don't buy a plan in a Plan Book and expect that to be your construction drawing. Hire a professional.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 6:03 pm

Bill B wrote:
Actually I was looking at the cert. for homes.
One thing that does concern me is points for rafter/joist/framing on larger than 16" on center. But I'm not a carpenter.
My wife and I are working on what "features" we want built into our next home (in AZ) and this might yield some good ideas.
It is pretty common common to go 24" OC for ceilings and roofs if prefab joists are used. Less wood is used and there are fewer thermal breaks, so energy efficiency rises. I would spend a significant amount of time researching builders. Find someone who takes pride in their work and is excited about green building and energy efficiency. A good builder will help you decide what the most cost effective way to build an energy efficient home that will you will enjoy.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 6:30 pm

sparks wrote:
Bill B wrote:
Actually I was looking at the cert. for homes.
One thing that does concern me is points for rafter/joist/framing on larger than 16" on center. But I'm not a carpenter.
My wife and I are working on what "features" we want built into our next home (in AZ) and this might yield some good ideas.
It is pretty common common to go 24" OC for ceilings and roofs if prefab joists are used. Less wood is used and there are fewer thermal breaks, so energy efficiency rises. I would spend a significant amount of time researching builders. Find someone who takes pride in their work and is excited about green building and energy efficiency. A good builder will help you decide what the most cost effective way to build an energy efficient home that will you will enjoy.
It isn't because less wood is used, it is because with the advancement of glues and polymers, truss manufacturers can fabricate these trusses with the wood they normally used to throw away. The real crap. Then the trusses are fabricated under extreme pressures.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 8:25 pm

LoisLane wrote:
sparks wrote:
Bill B wrote:
Actually I was looking at the cert. for homes.
One thing that does concern me is points for rafter/joist/framing on larger than 16" on center. But I'm not a carpenter.
My wife and I are working on what "features" we want built into our next home (in AZ) and this might yield some good ideas.
It is pretty common common to go 24" OC for ceilings and roofs if prefab joists are used. Less wood is used and there are fewer thermal breaks, so energy efficiency rises. I would spend a significant amount of time researching builders. Find someone who takes pride in their work and is excited about green building and energy efficiency. A good builder will help you decide what the most cost effective way to build an energy efficient home that will you will enjoy.
It isn't because less wood is used, it is because with the advancement of glues and polymers, truss manufacturers can fabricate these trusses with the wood they normally used to throw away. The real crap. Then the trusses are fabricated under extreme pressures.
If you set trusses at 24"OC instead of 16"OC, you use one third less wood. I realize that it may be difficult for a secretary/bookkeeper who rarely sets foot on a construction site to understand how buildings go together, but
increasing spacing means less material is used. LEED looks at the entire building process and grants points for conserving and reusing material.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 9:33 pm

sparks wrote:
It is pretty common common to go 24" OC for ceilings and roofs if prefab joists are used. Less wood is used and there are fewer thermal breaks, so energy efficiency rises. I would spend a significant amount of time researching builders. Find someone who takes pride in their work and is excited about green building and energy efficiency. A good builder will help you decide what the most cost effective way to build an energy efficient home that will you will enjoy.

Thanks. Actually SIP's have rather intrigued me for a period of time. Our tentative plan was to find a floor plan we like and sit down with an architect to make sure the home would fit our wants which at this time include solar power and hot water (with a tankless backup), a "water furnace" type of geothermal heating cooling, and energy efficient construction using natural lighting and passive solar.
I've become a proponent of small scale solar in the last few years that I have been researching the subject and wish that there were more education about it in the general public and believe that the state and local gov't could do much more to promote the use, including incentives (omg, a republican saying that! lol), thus reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and foreign sources for our energy.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/8/2009, 11:24 pm

Sorry Sparks, but no way in hell will I ever use particle board for anything in my house except furniture

Guess I will never own a LEEDS certified house, because I want real wood.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 5:40 am

Bill B wrote:
sparks wrote:
It is pretty common common to go 24" OC for ceilings and roofs if prefab joists are used. Less wood is used and there are fewer thermal breaks, so energy efficiency rises. I would spend a significant amount of time researching builders. Find someone who takes pride in their work and is excited about green building and energy efficiency. A good builder will help you decide what the most cost effective way to build an energy efficient home that will you will enjoy.

Thanks. Actually SIP's have rather intrigued me for a period of time. Our tentative plan was to find a floor plan we like and sit down with an architect to make sure the home would fit our wants which at this time include solar power and hot water (with a tankless backup), a "water furnace" type of geothermal heating cooling, and energy efficient construction using natural lighting and passive solar.
I've become a proponent of small scale solar in the last few years that I have been researching the subject and wish that there were more education about it in the general public and believe that the state and local gov't could do much more to promote the use, including incentives (omg, a republican saying that! lol), thus reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and foreign sources for our energy.
I've worked on condos that were built with prefab walls built in Rensselear. That's not quite the same thing as an SIP, but they both go together rapidly. As far as an architect, I'm not sure I would spend my money that way. In residential construction I have come across very few architects who are worth the fees they charge. On
several of the large residential projects I worked on, the architects were totally unwilling to deal with the building inspectors who red-tagged the framing that was built to the designs they specified. One of my favorite homes was built by a couple who are school teachers. They put to large amount of time and energy into looking at plans and deciding what they really wanted in a home. They were able to build the house without on architect or general contractor, saving thousands of dollars.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:08 am

sparks wrote:
If you set trusses at 24"OC instead of 16"OC, you use one third less wood. I realize that it may be difficult for a secretary/bookkeeper who rarely sets foot on a construction site to understand how buildings go together, but
increasing spacing means less material is used. LEED looks at the entire building process and grants points for conserving and reusing material.
Geez Admin,
I got a FINAL WARNING for less than this!
Double standard, maybe?
Lois

P.S. You know, I could really get nasty, and for the past few days, I held my tongue. For some reason, Admin, you are giving sparks a lot of leeway. Just why is that? And please post your answer here, so all can see it!


Last edited by LoisLane on 1/9/2009, 8:24 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:23 am

sparks wrote:
I've worked on condos that were built with prefab walls built in Rensselear. That's not quite the same thing as an SIP, but they both go together rapidly. As far as an architect, I'm not sure I would spend my money that way. In residential construction I have come across very few architects who are worth the fees they charge. On
several of the large residential projects I worked on, the architects were totally unwilling to deal with the building inspectors who red-tagged the framing that was built to the designs they specified. One of my favorite homes was built by a couple who are school teachers. They put to large amount of time and energy into looking at plans and deciding what they really wanted in a home. They were able to build the house without on architect or general contractor, saving thousands of dollars.

Actually for some of what we are wanting to do a specialized architect would make me feel a whole lot better about the project. Or maybe I should say architectual firm.
I am not confident enough in my own knowledge of construction to act as my own general contractor.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:27 am

Bill B wrote:
sparks wrote:
I've worked on condos that were built with prefab walls built in Rensselear. That's not quite the same thing as an SIP, but they both go together rapidly. As far as an architect, I'm not sure I would spend my money that way. In residential construction I have come across very few architects who are worth the fees they charge. On
several of the large residential projects I worked on, the architects were totally unwilling to deal with the building inspectors who red-tagged the framing that was built to the designs they specified. One of my favorite homes was built by a couple who are school teachers. They put to large amount of time and energy into looking at plans and deciding what they really wanted in a home. They were able to build the house without on architect or general contractor, saving thousands of dollars.

Actually for some of what we are wanting to do a specialized architect would make me feel a whole lot better about the project. Or maybe I should say architectual firm.
I am not confident enough in my own knowledge of construction to act as my own general contractor.

And that, sir, is a step in the right direction. A professional will not only do a proper design, but will oversee the entire project, and thus, protect your interest.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:32 am

sparks wrote:
I've worked on condos that were built with prefab walls built in Rensselear. That's not quite the same thing as an SIP, but they both go together rapidly. As far as an architect, I'm not sure I would spend my money that way. In residential construction I have come across very few architects who are worth the fees they charge. On
several of the large residential projects I worked on, the architects were totally unwilling to deal with the building inspectors who red-tagged the framing that was built to the designs they specified. One of my favorite homes was built by a couple who are school teachers. They put to large amount of time and energy into looking at plans and deciding what they really wanted in a home. They were able to build the house without on architect or general contractor, saving thousands of dollars.
Really? And who drew their plans? There isn't a state in the U.S. that will allow you to build a home without a set of sealed architectural drawings.
Also, to what Building Code did they build this home?
Or was it built in the back woods in Colorado?
More than likely, illegally.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:36 am

Bill B wrote:
sparks wrote:
I've worked on condos that were built with prefab walls built in Rensselear. That's not quite the same thing as an SIP, but they both go together rapidly. As far as an architect, I'm not sure I would spend my money that way. In residential construction I have come across very few architects who are worth the fees they charge. On
several of the large residential projects I worked on, the architects were totally unwilling to deal with the building inspectors who red-tagged the framing that was built to the designs they specified. One of my favorite homes was built by a couple who are school teachers. They put to large amount of time and energy into looking at plans and deciding what they really wanted in a home. They were able to build the house without on architect or general contractor, saving thousands of dollars.

Actually for some of what we are wanting to do a specialized architect would make me feel a whole lot better about the project. Or maybe I should say architectual firm.
I am not confident enough in my own knowledge of construction to act as my own general contractor.
Here are some comments from someone who did build their own dream home. You would be surprised how many of the basic skills you already possess will lead towards building your own home.
Owner/builder

An owner/builder can theoretically do most of the work in building his or her own house. Most building authorities recognize that people often want to do the work themselves rather than hire professional contractors and laborers. Of course an owner/builder is still subject to the same code requirements as the professionals would be.

Building in this mode can save a lot of money and be immensely satisfying at the same time. I had always wanted to design and build my own house, and it wasn't until I was in my fifties that I was able to realize this dream; all of the construction I did before this had been either remodeling existing structures or working for other people. I must say that living in a house that I designed and built brings joy to my life in many ways; the building fits our needs and aesthetics so perfectly.

Most of the books listed here relate to conventional construction techniques. However much of the design work and planning that goes into building a house is the same, regardless of the materials used. Also much of the detailed work related to electrical and plumbing, etc. is the same.
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:46 am

Total B.S. All an owner is allowed to do is finish work. No structural, electrical, or mechanical, for obvious reasons.
See my post above.
sparks wrote:
Owner/builder

An owner/builder can theoretically do most of the work in building his or her own house. Most building authorities recognize that people often want to do the work themselves rather than hire professional contractors and laborers. Of course an owner/builder is still subject to the same code requirements as the professionals would be.

Building in this mode can save a lot of money and be immensely satisfying at the same time. I had always wanted to design and build my own house, and it wasn't until I was in my fifties that I was able to realize this dream; all of the construction I did before this had been either remodeling existing structures or working for other people. I must say that living in a house that I designed and built brings joy to my life in many ways; the building fits our needs and aesthetics so perfectly.

Most of the books listed here relate to conventional construction techniques. However much of the design work and planning that goes into building a house is the same, regardless of the materials used. Also much of the detailed work related to electrical and plumbing, etc. is the same. [/color]
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PostSubject: Re: LEED certification of Centennial park   1/9/2009, 8:59 am

A lot of that depends on local codes. Where I intend to build, I could do everything myself. While I do have a lot of skills (including electrical Smile ) wood and I don't get along.
I'll leave it to the professionals.
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